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Rickson Academy Avatar Rickson Academy posted

Rickson Gracie’s lifesaving advice

One time, Rickson Gracie met the journalist Luca Atalla in Rio de Janeiro, and they began talking about injuries, pain and recovery. "There are certain phases in life where our number-one sport becomes physical therapy," Rickson joked. After a few laughs, Rickson went back to talking seriously and offered a crucial lesson that Luca has carried for the past 20 years:

"What's important is to face injury as a limiting factor, but never as an excuse to hang out on the couch. It's necessary to spare the injured area, but you must exercise the other parts of the body, even if just the pinky toe."

This wise advice, as well as essential to the evolution of those who practice BJJ, is proving important nowadays to the health of the population, and can even save lives. 

In a recent study published in Sports Medicine, a science magazine, researchers proved that regular physical activity, of medium and high intensity, helps the body produce more important antibodies and lymphocytes -- including the ones that play a relevant role in the protection against the coronavirus. 

The group of scientists responsible for the study ran tests with people with the flu, pneumonia and chickenpox, and noticed that the sedentary subjects produced 50% fewer antibodies. 

In the study, conducted by a team of professors from American universities, more was learned: The risk of getting sick or dying from an infectious disease is 37% smaller in people who exercise around 30 minutes per day, five days a week. 

Christina May Moran de Brito, physiatrist and medical coordinator of the rehabilitation service of the Syrian-Lebanese Hospital in São Paulo, commented on the study in Brazilian newspapers. "People who exercise have a bigger reserve of muscles to lose, and that avoids overloading the immune system," she said.

Want to take better care of your body? Good nutrition, hydration, peace of mind and information are the best ways. But first you have to get away from that laziness and the couch's strong magnetic field. Stay healthy, and enjoy your training.

Rickson Academy Avatar Rickson Academy posted

Is there a BJJ technique Rickson dislikes?

Could there be a jiu-jitsu technique that Rickson Gracie might find not to be all that? Recently, upon answering a classic question from one of his followers, the master made clear what displeases him when it comes to his endless range of resources.

"I love all the techniques in our jiu-jitsu, but my favorite ones are those that are performed without effort, at the right time and in the most effective manner," he said. "Everything that comes out imperfect, with too much wasted energy, gritted teeth and use of force bothers me, and I end up not liking it even if the movement in the end works out."

Check out the question asked by the Rickson Academy member, and Rickson's answer, here.

Rickson Academy Avatar Rickson Academy posted

How to ‘flow with the go’ with Master Rickson

In the history of mankind, many brilliant artists have pursued the fluid state when creating and working. This, of course, does not exclude the great martial artists. 
 
Flowing, in BJJ, means to roll on autopilot, with body and mind responding almost unconsciously to the opponent’s attack, thanks to an almost sensorial connection between you and your partner, or between you and their moves. 
 
Those who are able to capture this connection will be capable of flowing. And then, at last, you will fight as if you’ve let your instinct do the driving as you ride shotgun and enjoy the wind in your face, almost startled by all that’s going on. 
 
To Master Rickson Gracie, reaching this fluid state comes with time and the sensibility of a student, who will slowly become able to execute almost magical transitions, as beautiful as a composer creating a symphony. That’s when your mind appears to be in a trance, with no need to think about what’s coming or to try to anticipate anything; you just act -- and flow with the go.
 
Asked one day about how one can learn once and for all this central concept to Rickson’s philosophy, the master summed it up with his usual wisdom:
 
“You need to educate your reflexes, and that comes with practice. You can read tens of jiu-jitsu books, but be aware that not even all the theory in the world contained within your brain will translate into efficiency in the critical moment, when you need to save yourself from a confrontation. Only practice makes the difference so you can absorb the knowledge, correct your movements and let the technique flow.”

Rickson Academy Avatar Rickson Academy posted

BJJ is having love for the details

One of the teachings found most frequently in Master Rickson's classes concerns attention and zeal for the smallest details. A tighter angle, a position to this or that side of your neck, can save you from some big trouble. 
 
Curiously, love for minutiae is a secret shared by some of history's greatest geniuses -- from Thomas Edison to Van Gogh, just to drop a couple of names. 
 
Some time ago, a great Brazilian writer reinforced this lesson in a virtual class with many students and younger journalists. Ruy Castro, author of award-winning books about bossa nova and the singer Carmem Miranda, was asked about the greatest virtue of a good writer. 
 
His swift reply came: "Easy: To never give up on seeking some piece of information, however small. In the case of a biographer or even a great journalist, the secret is to chase the small details without ever losing hope."

"It may take you six months or a year, and you will piss off some five people until you reach the one who knows, but you can't get deflated," he added. "A biography is made up of millions of particles of information; it's like a Chinese puzzle -- and every discovery will have its value. That's the fun of the whole thing. People always ask the reason for expending so much energy going after a minute detail, which very few readers will care about. But that's the fun. Finding that detail of the life of a character is a challenge that I posed to myself. And I have to win. If I start giving up on a detail, soon I'll be giving up on finding that relative, that old friend or boyfriend, and I won't tell the whole story. If you prefer to abandon the challenges and give up on investigating, it's better to not even write that book. Go do something else; go be a stockbroker. Don't give up on taking on the mysteries, be they easy or thorny."
 
So that's our lesson, whether you're a teacher, a fighter, chess player or puzzle enthusiast. Breathe, go deep into the details and never lose hope. Imagine your future self seeing your work done, and every drop of sweat will be justified. 

Rickson Academy Avatar Rickson Academy posted

#jiujitsu

view all
Rickson Academy Avatar Rickson Academy posted

Rickson Gracie’s lifesaving advice

One time, Rickson Gracie met the journalist Luca Atalla in Rio de Janeiro, and they began talking about injuries, pain and recovery. "There are certain phases in life where our number-one sport becomes physical therapy," Rickson joked. After a few laughs, Rickson went back to talking seriously and offered a crucial lesson that Luca has carried for the past 20 years:

"What's important is to face injury as a limiting factor, but never as an excuse to hang out on the couch. It's necessary to spare the injured area, but you must exercise the other parts of the body, even if just the pinky toe."

This wise advice, as well as essential to the evolution of those who practice BJJ, is proving important nowadays to the health of the population, and can even save lives. 

In a recent study published in Sports Medicine, a science magazine, researchers proved that regular physical activity, of medium and high intensity, helps the body produce more important antibodies and lymphocytes -- including the ones that play a relevant role in the protection against the coronavirus. 

The group of scientists responsible for the study ran tests with people with the flu, pneumonia and chickenpox, and noticed that the sedentary subjects produced 50% fewer antibodies. 

In the study, conducted by a team of professors from American universities, more was learned: The risk of getting sick or dying from an infectious disease is 37% smaller in people who exercise around 30 minutes per day, five days a week. 

Christina May Moran de Brito, physiatrist and medical coordinator of the rehabilitation service of the Syrian-Lebanese Hospital in São Paulo, commented on the study in Brazilian newspapers. "People who exercise have a bigger reserve of muscles to lose, and that avoids overloading the immune system," she said.

Want to take better care of your body? Good nutrition, hydration, peace of mind and information are the best ways. But first you have to get away from that laziness and the couch's strong magnetic field. Stay healthy, and enjoy your training.

Rickson Academy Avatar Rickson Academy posted

Is there a BJJ technique Rickson dislikes?

Could there be a jiu-jitsu technique that Rickson Gracie might find not to be all that? Recently, upon answering a classic question from one of his followers, the master made clear what displeases him when it comes to his endless range of resources.

"I love all the techniques in our jiu-jitsu, but my favorite ones are those that are performed without effort, at the right time and in the most effective manner," he said. "Everything that comes out imperfect, with too much wasted energy, gritted teeth and use of force bothers me, and I end up not liking it even if the movement in the end works out."

Check out the question asked by the Rickson Academy member, and Rickson's answer, here.

Rickson Academy Avatar Rickson Academy posted

How to ‘flow with the go’ with Master Rickson

In the history of mankind, many brilliant artists have pursued the fluid state when creating and working. This, of course, does not exclude the great martial artists. 
 
Flowing, in BJJ, means to roll on autopilot, with body and mind responding almost unconsciously to the opponent’s attack, thanks to an almost sensorial connection between you and your partner, or between you and their moves. 
 
Those who are able to capture this connection will be capable of flowing. And then, at last, you will fight as if you’ve let your instinct do the driving as you ride shotgun and enjoy the wind in your face, almost startled by all that’s going on. 
 
To Master Rickson Gracie, reaching this fluid state comes with time and the sensibility of a student, who will slowly become able to execute almost magical transitions, as beautiful as a composer creating a symphony. That’s when your mind appears to be in a trance, with no need to think about what’s coming or to try to anticipate anything; you just act -- and flow with the go.
 
Asked one day about how one can learn once and for all this central concept to Rickson’s philosophy, the master summed it up with his usual wisdom:
 
“You need to educate your reflexes, and that comes with practice. You can read tens of jiu-jitsu books, but be aware that not even all the theory in the world contained within your brain will translate into efficiency in the critical moment, when you need to save yourself from a confrontation. Only practice makes the difference so you can absorb the knowledge, correct your movements and let the technique flow.”

Rickson Academy Avatar Rickson Academy posted

BJJ is having love for the details

One of the teachings found most frequently in Master Rickson's classes concerns attention and zeal for the smallest details. A tighter angle, a position to this or that side of your neck, can save you from some big trouble. 
 
Curiously, love for minutiae is a secret shared by some of history's greatest geniuses -- from Thomas Edison to Van Gogh, just to drop a couple of names. 
 
Some time ago, a great Brazilian writer reinforced this lesson in a virtual class with many students and younger journalists. Ruy Castro, author of award-winning books about bossa nova and the singer Carmem Miranda, was asked about the greatest virtue of a good writer. 
 
His swift reply came: "Easy: To never give up on seeking some piece of information, however small. In the case of a biographer or even a great journalist, the secret is to chase the small details without ever losing hope."

"It may take you six months or a year, and you will piss off some five people until you reach the one who knows, but you can't get deflated," he added. "A biography is made up of millions of particles of information; it's like a Chinese puzzle -- and every discovery will have its value. That's the fun of the whole thing. People always ask the reason for expending so much energy going after a minute detail, which very few readers will care about. But that's the fun. Finding that detail of the life of a character is a challenge that I posed to myself. And I have to win. If I start giving up on a detail, soon I'll be giving up on finding that relative, that old friend or boyfriend, and I won't tell the whole story. If you prefer to abandon the challenges and give up on investigating, it's better to not even write that book. Go do something else; go be a stockbroker. Don't give up on taking on the mysteries, be they easy or thorny."
 
So that's our lesson, whether you're a teacher, a fighter, chess player or puzzle enthusiast. Breathe, go deep into the details and never lose hope. Imagine your future self seeing your work done, and every drop of sweat will be justified. 

Rickson Academy Avatar Rickson Academy posted

#jiujitsu

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Latest Comments

kamkh Avatar
kamkh commented:

Very helpful, thank you!

June 13, 2021 06:44 PM

Fr. Thomas Sandberg Avatar
Fr. Thomas Sandberg commented:

🙏

June 11, 2021 04:08 PM

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